New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts Sketch Exhibition 1919

New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts Sketch Exhibition 1919

This was the second iteration of the annual New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts Sketch Exhibition. They did not have catalogues until 1932 so no information is recorded as to the entries Flora Scales made to this exhibit. Two artworks are specifically mentioned in reviews, Emery’s Favourite and The Head of a Woman.

One reviewer notes, “This evening at 9.30 o'clock will mark the close of the most successful sketch exhibition, not only artistically but financially, that the Academy of Fine Arts has ever held. Sales of pictures are said to exceed those of the sketch exhibition of 1918, and a substantial increase in the number of visitors has been recorded.” The same article goes on to say, "It may be a fortunate circumstance for the art of this country that our workers and students are so remote from the influence of the Bolshevists in paint—the art anarchists whose defecations are labelled cubism, futurism, vorticism, and synchronism.” – ‘Sketch Exhibition’, Evening Post, 10 May 1919, pg 9

Date

May, 1919

Location

Wellington, New Zealand

Exhibition reviews

‘Merely Sketches’, Evening Post, 2 May 1919, pg 8, “In oils and water colours will be seen some few works by that clever painter of horses, Miss Flora Scales. She has a white circus pony—"Emery's Favourite"—a beast full of character as Miss Scales depicts him. She also shows quite strong work in a crayon drawing, "The Head of a Woman."” 

‘Sketch Exhibition’, New Zealand Times, 3 May 1919, pg 8, “Miss Flora Scales has some of her fine animal sketches, also the head of a woman in black and white.”

‘Academy of Fine Arts Sketch Exhibition’ by “The Lay Figure”, Dominion, 5 May 1919, pg 6, “Miss Flora Scales has achieved a well-deserved reputation as an animal painter, and her vigorously-drawn "Emery's-Favourite," a white circus pony, with the circus tent in the background, is a very effective and pleasing study. A small marine study, a true sketch, by the same artist, should also be noted.”

‘Sketch Exhibition’, Evening Post, 10 May 1919, pg 9, “The splendid individual work of A. F. Nicoll, E. G. Hood, F. Sedgwick, W, Tiller. A. Bender, W. A. Bowring, Nugent Welch, D. K. Richmond, E. K. Robinson, Violet Nelson, M. E. R. Tripe, E. L. Prince, Flora Scales, B. C. Dobie, and many others raises high hope that New Zealand art is destined to rank with the best craftsmanship of older lands. It may be a fortunate circumstance for the art of this country that our workers and students are so remote from the influence of the Bolshevists in paint—the art anarchists whose defecations are labelled cubism, futurism, vorticism, and synchronism.”