BC006

Overlooking the Bay

Elevated viewpoint towards small grassy knoll and bushy windblown trees to the left. Looking down past rooftops to distant water and hills through two vertical tree trunks.

Date
c. 1920 1925
Object type
painting
Medium and materials
oil on canvas
Dimensions
221x296mm
Place Made
New Zealand
Inscriptions

LL brown black brush point Flora Scales (F reversed)

Verso (not in artist's hand) Scales, H F M, Overlooking the Bay, mid 1920s, oil on canvas

Verso stamp Hocken Library marked Withdrawn (by hand)

Details
Credit Line

Donated to Hocken Collections - Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago Library, Dunedin, New Zealand by Mrs Margaret and Mr Dan Moir, Abernethy’s, Dunedin, 1973

Copyright Licence
Courtesy Hocken Collections - Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, 73/88
Current Collection

Hocken Collections - Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago Library

Current Location

Dunedin, New Zealand

General notes

Provisionally dated with reference to Hocken Collections documentation and stylistic similarities to Untitled [Stoke, Nelson] [BC013], dated 1922 by the artist.

Exhibitions
Used as illustration

‘Havens for Art: Nelson, Dunedin & Growth of Local Art’ by John Caselberg, Art New Zealand, issue 15, Autumn 1980, pg 48 (black and white)

References

‘Havens for Art: Nelson, Dunedin & Growth of Local Art’ by John Caselberg, Art New Zealand, issue 15, Autumn 1980, pp 40-51

“This proved particularly true for Woollaston when he learned that Flora Scales was temporarily living in Nelson. Born in Lower Hutt, she had studied art in London during 1908-12; then in France and Germany from 1928-31. She had recently been attending the Hans Hoffman School in Munich. Woollaston had seen and admired Flora Scales's paintings at her sister's house, in Christchurch. For the winter of 1934 he had planned to return to the Christchurch School of Art. Instead, when a letter came from her sister suggesting that he visit Flora Scales, he did so. Miss Scales agreed to discuss painting with him, if not to give formal lessons. During five visits, Woollaston records:
She pointed out the lack in my work of the things I wanted there. Vanishing perspective was routed... In Miss Scales own work I was aware as never before of space in painting. What she has painted, I told myself, was the over-thereness of the object - and it was fully the object that was over there, strongly coloured and amply drawn, no pale diminished visual remnant of it. And so distance, that was so deep in space, came to the surface of the picture. At the same time this indeed corresponded with the feel of the landscape views that I liked best seen from a height In the clear air of Nelson. The immediacy of things far away was intensely exciting. I began a new training along the lines I wanted. Gone was boredom out of the window along with perspective and anatomy. 'Draw for a month before you begin to paint the subject', instructed Miss Scales...(21)

He was lent notes from the Hoffman School. All thought of Christchurch was banished for Woollaston:
My mind sang all day now and my spirit leapt for joy. I read late at night and copied out the precious notes.(22)

21. Woollaston, Sage Tea
22. Ibid”